According to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, those with information technology (IT) skills have been getting hired at a rapid rate.
The agency reported that in July, there were 20,400 positions filled across a number of IT industries. Specifically, there were 10,400 jobs added in the computer system design field, 7,000 in telecommunications and 1,900 positions filled in the hosting, data processing and similar fields.
Industry experts say that the figures mean those with IT skills would find number of opportunities for employment.

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When it comes to software development, one of the most popular computers languages is Java, first created in 1995 by Sun Microsystems.
According to many technology experts, those who are able to develop programs using this code are regularly in demand thanks to its prevalence on the internet. However, in an interview with TheServerSide.com, Philadelphia recruiter Dave Fecak stated that some of the biggest names in the insurance industry had not changed their hiring practices in years.
He suggests having a presence in the area to help attract the best talent available.

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Software creators possess advanced technology skills that could make them attractive choices to many U.S. employers in 2013. According to CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., the software development sector is expected to produce the most jobs during the year, and employment experts predict the segment will increase its workforce by 7 percent.
“Where the U.S. will produce the most jobs in 2013 is likely to follow growth patterns of the last few years,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “The competition for educated, specialized labor has intensified as market demands increase.”
CareerBuilder ranked software development as its top job growth sector for 2013. Many software creators require bachelor’s degrees and other education to apply principles and techniques of engineering, computer science and mathematics. These specialists may also be required to embed systems software and help companies build state-of-the-art applications and databases.
Job growth in the software development segment may significantly impact U.S. employers. Companies could substantially boost their productivity by instituting quality systems to help employees’ manage their work.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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The mobile marking industry is one of the most promising sectors today, seeking to add thousands of jobs over the next few months.
Researchers at WANTED Analytics report there have been more than 6,000 jobs posted on the internet for those looking for employment in the mobile marketing sector. The report found that over the past year, there has been a 26 percent increase year-over-year from the same 90 period in 2011, a 134 percent increase from 2010 and a 400 percent climb from 2009.
Marketers with mobile skills are most frequently advertised for jobs located in the New York metropolitan area. Over the past 90 days, more than 1,000 marketing job ads in New York included mobile skill requirements and grew more than average, up 31% versus the same time period in 2011.
One mobile marketing firm that recently opened a new office and is looking to hire is Fiksu. In a release, the company said that it was opening a new office in North Hampton, Massachusetts and was looking to hire many new positions to handle operations.

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People with the right technology skills are often in high demand, as many firms seek to increase staff to meet demand. In one recent case, Seattle-based Microsoft stepped up hiring in preparation for the release of its new tablet.
Tech Radar reports that the technology company is looking to bring on new staff for the latest version of the Microsoft Tablet. The roles that need to be filled include mechanical engineers, packaging designers and manufacturing professionals.
The company says that one of the perks of getting hired is the collaboration that takes place between different departments.
“Creating these devices involves a close partnership between hardware and software engineers, designers, and manufacturing,” the job posting states, according to TechRadar. “We are currently building the next generation and Surface needs you!”
There are other signs that the technology sector could help improve the job market. A report from employment firm Dice found that 73 percent of hiring managers in the IT sector surveyed said they will increase hiring in the second half of 2012.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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Thanks to advancements in technology, employers have been able to find new workers online instead of having to sort through paper applications. However, the process has meant that in some cases, qualified candidates never get hired.
According to many experts, the computerized systems, which are becoming more common than ever, use a series of yes or no questions and then filter out applicants based on the results. In an interview with the Baltimore Sun, University of Pennsylvania professor Peter Cappelli said that the systems were falling short.
“The problem comes with employers trying to use these systems for more than they’re capable of doing,” said Cappelli, director of Wharton’s Center for Human Resources, in an interview with the source. “They have so constrained their criteria, they end up with nothing. They want skill sets that don’t exist.”
Some of the largest names in the tech industry have seen many jobs unfilled. For example, technology firm Microsoft says that it has 6,000 positions open, according to InformationWeek. Many of those positions have remained unclaimed due to a shortage of qualified candidates, the source reported.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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According to a recent survey from HeadHunter.com and CareerBuilder, 31 percent of employers asked are looking to bring on board a new executive during the next six months.
The employment plans mark a 23 percent increase from October’s forecast and revealed that there are a number of different positions that will need to be filled over the next half of the year. Twenty-four percent of those surveyed said that they would be adding an executive in the business development department, while 23 percent planned to employ a new information technology executive, 22 percent sought a sales executive and 19 percent looked to fill this role in marketing.
“Hiring trends for executive-level management mirror what we’re seeing in the labor market for all workers,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “As companies look to expand their sales force, develop new products and improve their tech infrastructure, the need for diverse, experienced leadership grows along with these initiatives.”
While many companies are likely to add new high-level staff members, overall job growth slowed in the month of April. A report from the Labor Department revealed that employers added 115,000 jobs – fewer than what was expected by various experts.

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Kentucky will soon be home to a brand new customer service center, bringing with it many new jobs as a result.
Amazon announced that it was planning to build a new facility in Winchester, and will hire 600 seasonal and 550 full-time employees by 2017. The 70,000-square-foot building will house workers to provide customer support for clients of the online retailer.
Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear said that he was thrilled that more people would be able to find employment with the Fortune 500 company.
“Amazon’s decision to grow its Kentucky footprint is fantastic news, especially when you consider the impact of more than 1,100 full-time and seasonal jobs it will bring to the central Kentucky region,” Beshear said. “Kentucky is proud to have Amazon choose Winchester for this growth opportunity and wishes them continued success and prosperity.”
Many are looking to the technology industry to help spur job growth. At a recent speech at SUNY Albany, President Barack Obama said that the sector would be vital to the economic recovery of the U.S.
Read more from the original source: More jobs flowing to Amazon

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A new report has found that the search for top executives to lead in nearly all sectors continues despite concerns over the financial stability of the U.S. and European economies.

Here is the original post: Executive outlook report finds hiring boom continues despite economic concerns

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By Kim Isaacs, Monster Resume
Expert
Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to find a sample resume that
matches your background, copy it to your word-processing program,
make minor changes and be done with the arduous task of creating a
dazzling resume? While that would be ideal, you can shortchange
yourself and sabotage your job search if you base your resume on a
sample document.
The good news is that if done correctly, taking ideas from
resumes in books or free resume examples online can greatly improve
your own. Here’s how to use resume samples without copying them
verbatim.
The Pitfalls of Using Sample Resumes
“The problem with using a template or copying someone else’s
resume — whether from a book or from a friend — is that it
doesn’t allow for the uniqueness of each person’s skills,
experience and career history,” explains Louise Kursmark, a career
consultant and principal of Best Impression Career Services.
Kursmark is also the author of 18 career-management books,
including Expert Resumes for Managers and
Executives
and Executive’s Pocket Guide to ROI
Resumes and Job Search
.
Resume writing veteran and author Teena Rose concurs. “Job seekers
need to understand that resumes are like fingerprints; no two are
(or should be) alike,” she says. “Resumes should differ because of
the varying education levels, career experience and scope of skills
that job seekers possess.”
Additionally, copying a sample the author hasn’t given permission
to copy is plagiarism, so check the copyright notice.
How to Effectively Harness Sample
Resumes
Kursmark says there is nothing wrong with taking a little bit from
various samples to make it easier to construct your own resume.
“That’s what sample books are for: To inspire you and guide you,”
she says.
For example, “You might really like one person’s introduction –
the way they’ve clearly presented their unique value — and use
that introduction as a guide for writing your own distinct
content,” Kursmark says. “Or you might grab a
bold accomplishment statement from someone else’s resume
and update the numbers or results to make it applicable
to you.”
Here are more of Kursmark’s tips to help you make the best use of
resume samples:
  • Look for resumes in your field and mine them for
    industry-specific activities, terms and accomplishments. Have you
    done similar things? Is your skill set comparable?
  • After you’ve reviewed resumes in your field, peruse resumes
    across fields to understand how to vary the use of action verbs and
    get a feel for what makes a powerful accomplishment statement. Then
    write your own statements, as appropriate, modeled on the ones you
    like best.
  • Look for innovative formats and striking presentation,
    such as charts and tables. Can you include a strong visual that
    will immediately grab the reader’s attention?
  • Dip into numerous resumes to get a feel for good writing,
    concise yet compelling language and high-impact accomplishments.
    Work on your own resume with those examples in mind.
  • Read your revamped resume with a critical eye to make sure
    it reflects you. Will the image you present in person be congruent
    with your resume? “If you’ve included material just because it
    sounded good but you don’t have the details to back it up, you’ll
    destroy your credibility in the interview,” warns Kursmark.
Finally, when reviewing resume samples, think customize,
not plagiarize. “Use samples as a guide for ideas, but take pride
in writing a resume that has your own unique content and visual
appeal,” advises Rose.
This article is courtesy of Monster.com

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