As the global economy slowly begins to improve, California-based Tibco Software Incorporated has announced plans to hire 500 people in the U.S. this year.
Vivek Ranadive, Tibco’s chief executive officer, told Bloomberg News that his business-software company is looking to recruit workers from the nation’s top colleges including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford.
“We are hiring quite rapidly now, all in sales and service. It’s a good time to hire. Some big banks aren’t hiring, so there isn’t as much competition for workers from Wall Street,” Ranadive added. “We are very optimistic about 2012, even in Europe. I think it’s like a well-kept secret that U.S. is doing better.”
Meanwhile, a new report has found that technology professionals are now earning some of their largest annual salaries since 2008.
The 2012-2011 Salary Survey found that after two straight years of flat wages, tech workers earned an average salary increase of more than 2 percent in 2010.
Tech workers in Chicago and Seattle saw the largest increases at 5 percent, followed by Denver, Dallas, New York and Los Angeles.

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Posting slower-than-expected revenue growth, flash software maker Adobe Systems Incorporated has announced it would be laying off hundreds of workers in the U.S. and Europe. The news isn’t quite so bleak for New York software developer Altair, who has nearly 600 open positions advertised on its website.
The Wall Street Journal reports that the California-based Adobe said it would be cutting as many as 750 jobs in order to better concentrate on its digital media and digital marketing departments.
Adobe said the restructuring also included a bigger investment in its web formatting called HTML5, rather than its popular Adobe Flash player.
Meanwhile, the Troy, New York-based simulation software maker Altair is looking to fill hundreds of jobs at its headquarters and other offices around the world, according to MLive.com.
The company said it was having trouble finding qualified workers with technical degrees. Altair said it recently held 10 job fairs with a focus on hiring talented students, mostly from master’s degree programs. The company also announced a new internship program, which is set to get underway next summer.

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Ohio officials are hoping that a multi-million award to the biotechnology industry will help boost innovation and education in order to create more jobs in the field. The move comes in the wake of a new report that second quarter earnings for the sector rose despite a stalled economic rebound.
The Ohio Third Frontier recently announced the award package that will go toward state healthcare and biotechnology programs to accelerate growth in the biomedical and medical imaging fields.
Under the initiative, the biomedial and imaging sector will receive $8 million including almost $1 million to the Cleveland-based Arteriocyte Incorporated, which is working with Ohio State University to develop stem cell expansion for clinical applications, and the West Chester-based ArtiCure Incorporated, which was given $1 million to make and market clips used in open heart surgery.
Financial analysts said that the biotechnology field is proving to be a top performer on Wall Street after some top stocks fell on news of deflated sales.
The Record reports that overall stocks fell an average of 0.4 percent in the second quarter of this year, while biotechnology and healthcare stocks saw an average gain of 7.3 percent during the same time period.

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With technology seemingly progressing everyday, it is no wonder that companies on the cutting edge are hiring.
A recent poll of chief executive officers (CEOs) about economic conditions in Silicon Valley revealed that many are optimistic about increases in hiring, according the San Francisco Chronicle.
The survey asked 175 executives a number of questions and revealed that 66 percent of them had increased payroll in 2010. The news source reports that that figure represents the highest percentage since the annual Business Climate survey’s inception eight years ago.
“So 2010 was a comeback year for Silicon Valley,” said Carl Guardino, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of San Jose’s SVLG, a nonpartisan public-policy group. “What’s exciting is we’re seeing job growth not only globally but here in Silicon Valley.”
Looking forward, 55 percent of expect job growth in the region to be even higher this coming year.
Silicon Valley isn’t the only place adding technology jobs as the Chicago Tribune reports that Chrysler is adding 60 positions at its Kokomo, Indiana plant. Some of these roles will reportedly concern information technology.

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With the rise of the internet over the past decade, perhaps no sector has benefited more than e-commerce.
For all the amazing things that the internet does, allowing people to conduct business of all varieties from their home is one of the most impressive. And the trend of this sector growing doesn’t appear to be slowing down.
The Salt Lake Tribune reports that online retailer CSN Stores is hiring a number of workers to help expand its business. Specifically, these workers will be performing customer-service functions at a facility in Ogden, Utah, for the company, which was founded in 2002.
“We just hired the first 30-plus people, and within the next several months, there certainly will be 100,” spokesman for the Boston-based company Dave Ladetto told the news source. “There could be around 200 [hires] over the next year.”
CSN isn’t the only internet company hiring however, as technology giant Apple is looking for at least one “Cloud Systems Software Engineer,” according to postings on its website. The posting says that the hire will help create the “the future of cloud services at Apple!”

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Auto insurance company Progressive Corporation has announced plans to hire more than 1,000 workers across five states.
The Associated Press reports the insurance agency is looking to fill a variety of positions including sales, claims and services.
In all, Cleveland-based Progressive said it expects to hire 1,106 new employees in Texas, Ohio, Colorado, Florida and Arizona.
The largest number of new employees, 390, will be hired for the company’s Riverview call center in Tampa Bay, Florida.
John Hoppe, Progressive’s national employment director, told the Tampa Bay Times that the job growth is largely driven by the company’s ability to build its customer base and beat out its competitors.
“It’s certainly the largest (hiring push) for us in the last five years, both in Tampa Bay and companywide,” Hoppe added. “There are some out there who say auto insurance is a leading indicator for the economy,” he said. “I’m not sure. I’m hopeful, but it’s too difficult to say. We’re able to continue growing in a down economy or an up economy.”
Most of the entry-level jobs will start with a base pay of $12 to $15 per hour.

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Over the past several months, private employment in the U.S. has
begun to rebound in an increasingly strong way. Through all of
2011, the private sector averaged 160,000 new positions per month,
exceeding the monthly rates of population growth (about 140,000)
and labor force growth (only about 20,000).
“Everyone is hearing about continued debt concerns in Europe,
but when it comes to not hiring in America, it’s used as an excuse
not to hire, rather than a reason,” notes Rob Romaine, president
ofMRINetwork. “Except for companies with heavy exposure to the
European market, businesses are making hiring decisions based on
the customers walking through their front door, not uncertainty
surrounding sovereign debt an ocean away.”
A recent survey ofMRINetwork recruiters noted an increase over
the last six months of employers backfilling positions that had
been left unfilled for two years or more. As one respondent said,
“I believe [employers] cut so deeply over the past two years that
productivity has suffered. Today, they are hiring out of necessity
and a belief that the economy has begun to turn.”
The evidence that the economy has turned is mounting. According
to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. economy grew at an
annualized rate of 2.8 percent during the fourth quarter of 2011,
the fourth consecutive increase. U.S. GDP in 2011 grew 1.7 percent,
not a rapid growth, but a far cry from projections of a double-dip
recession.
Such growth numbers are, compared to past periods of recovery,
rather weak. Yet, most important is where the growth is coming
from. In 2011,MRINetwork saw placements in the construction space
grow by nearly 50 percent, industrial placements by more than 30
percent and consumer products and services by more than 20
percent.
“Increased hiring of senior-level talent in these sectors is
promising for the general economy,” says Romaine. “It indicates a
confidence and a willingness by employers to invest in talent
across broad swaths of the economy despite headwinds that still
persist.”
But just as employers seem to be ramping up their hunt for
senior talent, the availability of such talent may be shrinking as
well. Over the last six months, employers have continued to
increase their use of counter-offers, hoping to retain top talent
long enough to backfill their positions. In highly technical
fields, such as chemical engineering or biotechnology, employers
have been forced to sweeten counter-offers because there simply
aren’t as many candidates as there are job openings.
Indeed, the unemployment rate for those with a bachelor’s degree
or higher-perhaps the broadest definition of the skilled,
professional workforce-fell in December to 4.1 percent, its lowest
rate in nearly three years.
“A full-blown, double-dip recession in Europe could have a
chilling effect on hiring in America. But, until it does impact the
U.S. directly, businesses are beginning to return to more normal
hiring patterns,” notes Romaine. “Companies are backfilling
vacancies and investing in new positions. We are in the midst of
the slow, but seemingly stable, rebound that had been
projected.”

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In January, total employment in the United States grew in excess of 200,000 jobs for the second consecutive month. The Labor Department reports 243,000 positions were added in the month and revisions show 203,000 were added in December. The U.S. unemployment rate fell from 8.5 to 8.3 percent despite an influx of more than 500,000 workers into the civilian labor market.

Furthermore, revisions to previous numbers, based on more complete data, show the employment situation may not have been as bad as first reported. Unemployment peaked at 10 percent for a single month in October 2009 before starting to fall. Past reports had unemployment remaining at or above 10 percent for three months. Revisions to 2011′s establishment data also show nearly 266,000 more jobs were created during the year than previously reported, accounting for nearly a 20 percent improvement.
Growth did not appear overly clustered in any specific sector in January, but rather it was spread throughout many
sectors. Manufacturing added 50,000 positions, mostly in durable goods, likely an extension of holiday spending which seemed to disproportionately lean towards such items. Food services and drinking places added 33,000 positions, healthcare added 31,000 and construction added 21,000. In the temporary help or contract
staffing space, employment grew by 20,100 after having been relatively flat in recent months.

The unemployment rate among those who hold a four-year degree rose from 4.1 to 4.2 percent in January, but that was mostly driven by an increase in those who hold such a degree looking for work. Actual employment by those with a four-year degree rose by 291,000 in January. The management, professional and related occupations unemployment rate fell year over year from 4.7 percent to 4.3 percent. The unemployment rate for those in sales or related
occupations also fell, from 9.1 to 8.2 percent from a year ago.

The recovery from the Great Recession has been characterized by fits and starts. Indeed, when comparing the speed
of the labor market’s recovery to past recessions, our current path is both longer and slower than any recovery over the last half century. The improvements seen over the last few months though, point to the beginning of a virtuous cycle, with an unemployment rate falling more precipitously than would have been projected just a few months ago.

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Somebody once said, “Nothing is more uncommon than common
sense.” Accordingly, here are 30 things I think common sense should
dictate:
  1. Leave for the interview with plenty of time to spare for the
    unexpected: traffic jam, car trouble, etc.
  2. Never go to an interview with a full bladder.
  3. Never chew gum, and obviously not tobacco.
  4. Don’t allow the job title to influence your decision.
  5. Wear conservative business attire. If the venue is very casual,
    overdress slightly. (Men: wear a sport jacket and tie. Women: wear
    tailored separates.)
  6. Never consider moving anywhere your family has no desire to
    live.
  7. Never ask to use the hiring authority’s phone.
  8. Don’t look at your watch.
  9. Remove your sunglasses.
  10. Maintain eye contact, but don’t stare.
  11. Listen intently, so you don’t have to keep repeating, “I’m
    sorry, but could you say that again?”
  12. Don’t ask about perks.
  13. Ask for the spelling of the interviewer’s name and write it
    down.
  14. Don’t mention a salary range in your resume or during an
    interview.
  15. Don’t tailor your personality in an attempt to charm your
    interviewer.
  16. Remain silent about your personal problems.
  17. Go to the interview unaccompanied.
  18. Don’t park at a meter or in a tow zone.
  19. Don’t drop names.
  20. Schedule nothing around your interview that will create a time
    crunch.
  21. Turn off your cell phone.
  22. Keep your eyes off the interviewer’s desk.
  23. Don’t handle anything, especially personal belongings.
  24. Get a haircut and shave if you need one.
  25. Avoid strong fragrances.
  26. Never be sarcastic.
  27. If required to drive others, perhaps to lunch, obey the law,
    exercise caution, and stay calm.
  28. Never criticize anyone, especially an employer.
  29. If asked to complete a form or application, fill in every
    space. Never write, “See resume.”
  30. Don’t linger. A long farewell is annoying.

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While the economy may not be entirely back up to speed, hiring appears to be picking up, according to CNN.
The news source reports that about 500,000 jobs have been added so far this year and that this is a result of many businesses maximizing the productivity of their current workers. Due to this, they now must bring in new employees to continue to grow.

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