People with the right technology skills are often in high demand, as many firms seek to increase staff to meet demand. In one recent case, Seattle-based Microsoft stepped up hiring in preparation for the release of its new tablet.
Tech Radar reports that the technology company is looking to bring on new staff for the latest version of the Microsoft Tablet. The roles that need to be filled include mechanical engineers, packaging designers and manufacturing professionals.
The company says that one of the perks of getting hired is the collaboration that takes place between different departments.
“Creating these devices involves a close partnership between hardware and software engineers, designers, and manufacturing,” the job posting states, according to TechRadar. “We are currently building the next generation and Surface needs you!”
There are other signs that the technology sector could help improve the job market. A report from employment firm Dice found that 73 percent of hiring managers in the IT sector surveyed said they will increase hiring in the second half of 2012.
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As the economic situation around the world remains tenuously optimistic, some sectors are undergoing massive transformations as a result of how these industries are changing each moment. One of the newest trends is that of big data, and its impact on IT hiring has added to the demand for more assistance within technology-heavy corporations.
Subsequently, the need for IT personnel is on the rise, but not in places that job hunters would typically consider or expect. According to InformationWeek, even though social media is rapidly expanding, firms within this sector aren’t hiring many new employees. On the other hand, help desk associates and system security workers are in the greatest demand according to the source’s 2012 State of IT Staffing Survey. Companies are focusing on keeping tabs on the information and services they already own, but IT staff are needed to assist in maintaining and perfecting these systems, the study showed.
US News and World Report supported that claim in a recent article. Technology and defense companies appear to be hiring most of the IT personnel in the United States these days, focusing on honing their comprehension and systems integr

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The economy is improving and the jobless rate continues to fall. Now at 5.4%, it is the lowest since May 2008.
See article in The Dispatch.

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Those with the right information technology (IT) skills can find a number of job opportunities at firms across the United States. According to one recent study, the sector is expected to see employment growth during the fourth quarter of 2012.
The survey from Robert Half Technology revealed that 9 percent of chief information officers (CIOs) expected to increase their company’s IT department during this time frame, while just 6 percent said they would be performing layoffs. Eighty-three percent said that staff levels would remain in place during the fourth quarter.
There are struggles, however, to find enough skilled workers to fill the open spots. Fifty-four percent of CIOs said that they had difficulty getting the right people for employment opportunities.

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Over the last few years, the increased value of IT in companies of all kinds has created many jobs in this field. Now, as the amount of data tech personnel must manage continues to rise exponentially and advanced devices and software are created to handle it, more hiring than ever should be expected.
The next few years should see nearly 2 million IT jobs opening up in the U.S. alone. According to Gartner, by 2015 American markets should expect about half of all big data jobs to exist within its borders, making the nation a leader in research and progress within the information market.
Part of the push here will be fueled by emerging trends in technology spending as well, ZDNet reported. The source stated that by the end of next year, purchases of hardware and software will push corporate budgets to nearly $30 billion annually, as will hiring new personnel to manage these platforms. Such strong spending trends are being seen on a global scale as well, and there seems to be no indication that big data is losing momentum. This could indicate that more jobs in IT are yet to come.
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See Dispatch article for news that Jobless rate lowest since ’08.
As our economy improves, overall unemployment keeps dropping in Central Ohio.
For technical professionals the rate is under 4%.

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Encouraging article on Ohio business startups this year- article in The Dispatch:

“Filings to do business in Ohio increase this year.
New filings to do business in Ohio totaled 6,665 in September, up from 6,143 in the same month of 2011, Secretary of State Jon Husted said.
The office reported 66,734 new-business filings this year through September, up from 63,026 during the same period last year.”

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Thanks to advancements in technology, employers have been able to find new workers online instead of having to sort through paper applications. However, the process has meant that in some cases, qualified candidates never get hired.
According to many experts, the computerized systems, which are becoming more common than ever, use a series of yes or no questions and then filter out applicants based on the results. In an interview with the Baltimore Sun, University of Pennsylvania professor Peter Cappelli said that the systems were falling short.
“The problem comes with employers trying to use these systems for more than they’re capable of doing,” said Cappelli, director of Wharton’s Center for Human Resources, in an interview with the source. “They have so constrained their criteria, they end up with nothing. They want skill sets that don’t exist.”
Some of the largest names in the tech industry have seen many jobs unfilled. For example, technology firm Microsoft says that it has 6,000 positions open, according to InformationWeek. Many of those positions have remained unclaimed due to a shortage of qualified candidates, the source reported.
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The recession left many once-vibrant industries on the brink of collapse, thanks to a considerable decline in consumer spending. While downturn affected men and women differently, both genders have seen an increase in the number of jobs added in recent months.
A report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) examined how females have recovered in the years since the recession. The group, which compiled its findings using data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, found during the three year period ending in June 2012, women have regained 38.7 percent of jobs lost during the recession.
“The recovery is finally reaching women,” said Dr. Heidi Hartmann, president of IWPR and a labor economist. “Women got more than one-third of the job gains in the third year of the recovery, much better than their share the previous year, despite the fact that women are bearing the brunt of state and local government cuts,” she said.
One sector that has been employing both sexes for quite some time is information technology (IT). According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 20,400 positions were added in IT departments.
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According to one recent report, the internet is quickly becoming a dominant force when it comes to hiring opportunities.
In the recently released Global Online Employment report, Elance revealed that demand for online positions was increasing at a faster rate than that of traditional jobs. The study found that during its second quarter there were almost 200,000 new employment opportunities in the field, 35 percent higher than the same time last year.
The head of the company said that part of the reason for the growth was due to the fact that people in the sector could work anywhere.
“The ease of working online — coupled with the ability to instantly connect with a highly specialized global talent pool — is driving massive adoption of online work,” said Fabio Rosati, CEO of Elance. “For the first time, demand for technical talent is being matched by equally strong demand for creative talent.”
Numerous firms are using online tools to help sort through applications of job seekers. Forbes reports that social media management company HootSuite was using The Resumator to better organize the process.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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