In January, total employment in the United States grew in excess of 200,000 jobs for the second consecutive month. The Labor Department reports 243,000 positions were added in the month and revisions show 203,000 were added in December. The U.S. unemployment rate fell from 8.5 to 8.3 percent despite an influx of more than 500,000 workers into the civilian labor market.

Furthermore, revisions to previous numbers, based on more complete data, show the employment situation may not have been as bad as first reported. Unemployment peaked at 10 percent for a single month in October 2009 before starting to fall. Past reports had unemployment remaining at or above 10 percent for three months. Revisions to 2011′s establishment data also show nearly 266,000 more jobs were created during the year than previously reported, accounting for nearly a 20 percent improvement.
Growth did not appear overly clustered in any specific sector in January, but rather it was spread throughout many
sectors. Manufacturing added 50,000 positions, mostly in durable goods, likely an extension of holiday spending which seemed to disproportionately lean towards such items. Food services and drinking places added 33,000 positions, healthcare added 31,000 and construction added 21,000. In the temporary help or contract
staffing space, employment grew by 20,100 after having been relatively flat in recent months.

The unemployment rate among those who hold a four-year degree rose from 4.1 to 4.2 percent in January, but that was mostly driven by an increase in those who hold such a degree looking for work. Actual employment by those with a four-year degree rose by 291,000 in January. The management, professional and related occupations unemployment rate fell year over year from 4.7 percent to 4.3 percent. The unemployment rate for those in sales or related
occupations also fell, from 9.1 to 8.2 percent from a year ago.

The recovery from the Great Recession has been characterized by fits and starts. Indeed, when comparing the speed
of the labor market’s recovery to past recessions, our current path is both longer and slower than any recovery over the last half century. The improvements seen over the last few months though, point to the beginning of a virtuous cycle, with an unemployment rate falling more precipitously than would have been projected just a few months ago.

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Somebody once said, “Nothing is more uncommon than common
sense.” Accordingly, here are 30 things I think common sense should
dictate:
  1. Leave for the interview with plenty of time to spare for the
    unexpected: traffic jam, car trouble, etc.
  2. Never go to an interview with a full bladder.
  3. Never chew gum, and obviously not tobacco.
  4. Don’t allow the job title to influence your decision.
  5. Wear conservative business attire. If the venue is very casual,
    overdress slightly. (Men: wear a sport jacket and tie. Women: wear
    tailored separates.)
  6. Never consider moving anywhere your family has no desire to
    live.
  7. Never ask to use the hiring authority’s phone.
  8. Don’t look at your watch.
  9. Remove your sunglasses.
  10. Maintain eye contact, but don’t stare.
  11. Listen intently, so you don’t have to keep repeating, “I’m
    sorry, but could you say that again?”
  12. Don’t ask about perks.
  13. Ask for the spelling of the interviewer’s name and write it
    down.
  14. Don’t mention a salary range in your resume or during an
    interview.
  15. Don’t tailor your personality in an attempt to charm your
    interviewer.
  16. Remain silent about your personal problems.
  17. Go to the interview unaccompanied.
  18. Don’t park at a meter or in a tow zone.
  19. Don’t drop names.
  20. Schedule nothing around your interview that will create a time
    crunch.
  21. Turn off your cell phone.
  22. Keep your eyes off the interviewer’s desk.
  23. Don’t handle anything, especially personal belongings.
  24. Get a haircut and shave if you need one.
  25. Avoid strong fragrances.
  26. Never be sarcastic.
  27. If required to drive others, perhaps to lunch, obey the law,
    exercise caution, and stay calm.
  28. Never criticize anyone, especially an employer.
  29. If asked to complete a form or application, fill in every
    space. Never write, “See resume.”
  30. Don’t linger. A long farewell is annoying.

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With the BLS report that unemployment is dropping, some are seeing agressive hiring. Check out this Dispatch Article.

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While the economy may not be entirely back up to speed, hiring appears to be picking up, according to CNN.
The news source reports that about 500,000 jobs have been added so far this year and that this is a result of many businesses maximizing the productivity of their current workers. Due to this, they now must bring in new employees to continue to grow.

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This report from ADP and MSNBC shows that hiring is increasing. A little noticed item is the upward revision for October. These changes are rarely reported by the mainstream media. The more complete Department of Labor report is due on Friday.
MSNBC Story 

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