Software creators possess advanced technology skills that could make them attractive choices to many U.S. employers in 2013. According to CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., the software development sector is expected to produce the most jobs during the year, and employment experts predict the segment will increase its workforce by 7 percent.
“Where the U.S. will produce the most jobs in 2013 is likely to follow growth patterns of the last few years,” said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder. “The competition for educated, specialized labor has intensified as market demands increase.”
CareerBuilder ranked software development as its top job growth sector for 2013. Many software creators require bachelor’s degrees and other education to apply principles and techniques of engineering, computer science and mathematics. These specialists may also be required to embed systems software and help companies build state-of-the-art applications and databases.
Job growth in the software development segment may significantly impact U.S. employers. Companies could substantially boost their productivity by instituting quality systems to help employees’ manage their work.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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According to a recent survey from HeadHunter.com and CareerBuilder, 31 percent of employers asked are looking to bring on board a new executive during the next six months.
The employment plans mark a 23 percent increase from October’s forecast and revealed that there are a number of different positions that will need to be filled over the next half of the year. Twenty-four percent of those surveyed said that they would be adding an executive in the business development department, while 23 percent planned to employ a new information technology executive, 22 percent sought a sales executive and 19 percent looked to fill this role in marketing.
“Hiring trends for executive-level management mirror what we’re seeing in the labor market for all workers,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “As companies look to expand their sales force, develop new products and improve their tech infrastructure, the need for diverse, experienced leadership grows along with these initiatives.”
While many companies are likely to add new high-level staff members, overall job growth slowed in the month of April. A report from the Labor Department revealed that employers added 115,000 jobs – fewer than what was expected by various experts.

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A recent study by Forbes and Indeed.com looked at the companies in the technology sector that would be most likely to hire in the near future.
The groups found that Microsoft was the leading firm when it came to job openings, with 1,521 unique listings. The roles the company is looking to fill include network administrators, designers, engineers and software developers.
Other firms a sizable number of openings include Amazon.com, with 1,348 and IBM with 1,329 positions, open to those with the right technology skills.
Those looking to get hired will have to ensure that they leverage the right resources to impress the interviewer.
“Websites like CareerCup.com andGlassdoor.com will give you a good sense of the types of interview questions you might be asked,” said Gayle Laakmann McDowell, author of The Google Resume, said in an interview with Forbes. “But don’t stop at the technical or expertise questions. You can and should prepare for behavioral questions. Read through your resume and find ways of talking concisely and effectively about each of your accomplishments.”
Technology companies are expected to spend big bucks on bringing on qualified talent to improve products and services.

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Job growth may be sluggish in certain sectors in the United States, but start-up companies across the nation are standing with open arms. According to an infographic released by StartUpHire, engineering and other technical jobs account for approximately 36 percent of all open jobs at start-ups, but less than 15 percent of candidates are applying for the positions.
Overall, software engineers had the largest number of open jobs in 2011 with more than 42,000 jobs posted. Sales positions were the only other sector where there were less applicants than opening.
In addition to start-up companies looking to hire engineers and software developers, tech giant Google is also seeking trained professionals. Google employs nearly 32,467 people, and in 2012, has shown a greater emphasis on boosting product development, according to ZDnet.
Tech-savvy professionals who want to find employment opportunities may want to consider the benefits of getting in early at start-up companies and how it may be easier to grow at smaller organizations. However, with stable organizations like Google also looking to grow, it may be worthwhile to submit applications to more financially sound employers.

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As many areas of the economy still struggle to rebound, the information technology (IT) sector appears to be on its way to recovery with two major companies announcing expansions.
In Indianapolis, the consumer review website Angie’s List said it plans to double its staff at its local headquarters, adding as many as 500 new jobs within the next four years.
The company, founded by its only employee Angie Hicks in 1995, said it will pour more than $11 million to expand its campus and train new workers.
The news comes after another information technology company, Knowledge Services, announced plans to expand its headquarters and add 200 new jobs in northeast Indiana.
In North Carolina, IT service company HCL Technologies said it will be adding to its local workforce in Cary, hiring about 300 new employees by next spring.
The Wake Forest Times Observer reports that HCL’s Cary office is already the India-based company’s fastest growing U.S. facility.
HCL is among a number of other high-tech companies that have announced expansions in the area, including Xerox subsidiary Affiliated Computer Services, who said it will hire about 250 local workers next year.

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Two new reports have found that hiring and revenue in the high tech sector are on the upswing, with more computer software companies struggling to find qualified workers.
According to the September WANTED Analytics report, more than 28,000 jobs for computer applications software engineers were posted online, a 23 percent growth over the past year. Companies on the West Coast had the highest rate of placement for computer specialists during September.
Along with the rise in the number of jobs posted online for software engineers, the report also found that the number of companies looking to hire applications workers grew by 66 percent since 2009. Some of the most in-demand jobs included positions with specialities in Java, .Net and Linux.
A second report by Research and Markets has found that revenue from the U.S. software sector has a combined annual revenue of approximately $220 billion, with about 60 percent of industry profits generated from software publishing.
The report found that the U.S. computer industry currently consists of approximately 500,000 companies, the largest of those businesses include Activision, Blizzard, Microsoft and Symantec.

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Red Hat, one of the biggest commercial Linus vending companies, plans to hire at least 1,000 new workers this year

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Two major medical device companies will be expanding operations into Northeast Ohio.
Phillips Healthcare, maker of diagnostic, clinical and home healthcare products, recently announced it plans to move approximately 100 jobs from its San Jose, California, operations to Highland Heights, Ohio, according to the Plain Dealer.
The company said the move is part of an effort to consolidate its nuclear medicine division. Most of the new jobs will be part of the research and development division with an average salary of $115,000 per year.
Meanwhile, Steris Corporation, which manufacturers medical-equipment sterilizers and other healthcare equipment, said it was planning what it called a “significant” investment in the region that would create a number of new jobs.
Although the details of the deal have not yet been disclosed, Steris is expected to take advantage of state aid, as well as incentives from the nonprofit BioEnterprise, a group dedicated to build the region’s biomedical economy.
Baiju Shah, executive officer of BioEnterprise, told the Plain Dealer that more job creation from Phillips and Steris would help strengthen the state’s healthcare sector.
“Both of these companies are important flagship companies for the region. And both are leaders within their respective areas in the medical industry,” Shad noted.

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Over the past several months, private employment in the U.S. has
begun to rebound in an increasingly strong way. Through all of
2011, the private sector averaged 160,000 new positions per month,
exceeding the monthly rates of population growth (about 140,000)
and labor force growth (only about 20,000).
“Everyone is hearing about continued debt concerns in Europe,
but when it comes to not hiring in America, it’s used as an excuse
not to hire, rather than a reason,” notes Rob Romaine, president
ofMRINetwork. “Except for companies with heavy exposure to the
European market, businesses are making hiring decisions based on
the customers walking through their front door, not uncertainty
surrounding sovereign debt an ocean away.”
A recent survey ofMRINetwork recruiters noted an increase over
the last six months of employers backfilling positions that had
been left unfilled for two years or more. As one respondent said,
“I believe [employers] cut so deeply over the past two years that
productivity has suffered. Today, they are hiring out of necessity
and a belief that the economy has begun to turn.”
The evidence that the economy has turned is mounting. According
to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. economy grew at an
annualized rate of 2.8 percent during the fourth quarter of 2011,
the fourth consecutive increase. U.S. GDP in 2011 grew 1.7 percent,
not a rapid growth, but a far cry from projections of a double-dip
recession.
Such growth numbers are, compared to past periods of recovery,
rather weak. Yet, most important is where the growth is coming
from. In 2011,MRINetwork saw placements in the construction space
grow by nearly 50 percent, industrial placements by more than 30
percent and consumer products and services by more than 20
percent.
“Increased hiring of senior-level talent in these sectors is
promising for the general economy,” says Romaine. “It indicates a
confidence and a willingness by employers to invest in talent
across broad swaths of the economy despite headwinds that still
persist.”
But just as employers seem to be ramping up their hunt for
senior talent, the availability of such talent may be shrinking as
well. Over the last six months, employers have continued to
increase their use of counter-offers, hoping to retain top talent
long enough to backfill their positions. In highly technical
fields, such as chemical engineering or biotechnology, employers
have been forced to sweeten counter-offers because there simply
aren’t as many candidates as there are job openings.
Indeed, the unemployment rate for those with a bachelor’s degree
or higher-perhaps the broadest definition of the skilled,
professional workforce-fell in December to 4.1 percent, its lowest
rate in nearly three years.
“A full-blown, double-dip recession in Europe could have a
chilling effect on hiring in America. But, until it does impact the
U.S. directly, businesses are beginning to return to more normal
hiring patterns,” notes Romaine. “Companies are backfilling
vacancies and investing in new positions. We are in the midst of
the slow, but seemingly stable, rebound that had been
projected.”

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