When it comes to software development, one of the most popular computers languages is Java, first created in 1995 by Sun Microsystems.
According to many technology experts, those who are able to develop programs using this code are regularly in demand thanks to its prevalence on the internet. However, in an interview with TheServerSide.com, Philadelphia recruiter Dave Fecak stated that some of the biggest names in the insurance industry had not changed their hiring practices in years.
He suggests having a presence in the area to help attract the best talent available.

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People with the right technology skills are often in high demand, as many firms seek to increase staff to meet demand. In one recent case, Seattle-based Microsoft stepped up hiring in preparation for the release of its new tablet.
Tech Radar reports that the technology company is looking to bring on new staff for the latest version of the Microsoft Tablet. The roles that need to be filled include mechanical engineers, packaging designers and manufacturing professionals.
The company says that one of the perks of getting hired is the collaboration that takes place between different departments.
“Creating these devices involves a close partnership between hardware and software engineers, designers, and manufacturing,” the job posting states, according to TechRadar. “We are currently building the next generation and Surface needs you!”
There are other signs that the technology sector could help improve the job market. A report from employment firm Dice found that 73 percent of hiring managers in the IT sector surveyed said they will increase hiring in the second half of 2012.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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Those with the right information technology (IT) skills can find a number of job opportunities at firms across the United States. According to one recent study, the sector is expected to see employment growth during the fourth quarter of 2012.
The survey from Robert Half Technology revealed that 9 percent of chief information officers (CIOs) expected to increase their company’s IT department during this time frame, while just 6 percent said they would be performing layoffs. Eighty-three percent said that staff levels would remain in place during the fourth quarter.
There are struggles, however, to find enough skilled workers to fill the open spots. Fifty-four percent of CIOs said that they had difficulty getting the right people for employment opportunities.

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As many areas of the economy still struggle to rebound, the information technology (IT) sector appears to be on its way to recovery with two major companies announcing expansions.
In Indianapolis, the consumer review website Angie’s List said it plans to double its staff at its local headquarters, adding as many as 500 new jobs within the next four years.
The company, founded by its only employee Angie Hicks in 1995, said it will pour more than $11 million to expand its campus and train new workers.
The news comes after another information technology company, Knowledge Services, announced plans to expand its headquarters and add 200 new jobs in northeast Indiana.
In North Carolina, IT service company HCL Technologies said it will be adding to its local workforce in Cary, hiring about 300 new employees by next spring.
The Wake Forest Times Observer reports that HCL’s Cary office is already the India-based company’s fastest growing U.S. facility.
HCL is among a number of other high-tech companies that have announced expansions in the area, including Xerox subsidiary Affiliated Computer Services, who said it will hire about 250 local workers next year.

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That cute, affable guy who brags of his drunken exploits on
FaceBook.com may be meeting a lot of other partiers online, but
he’s probably not getting added to the “friends” lists of many
corporate recruiters. A recent study by the executive search firm
ExecuNet found that 77 percent of recruiters run searches of
candidates on the Web to screen applicants; 35 percent of these
same recruiters say they’ve eliminated a candidate based on the
information they uncovered.
“You’d be surprised at what I’ve seen when researching
candidates,” says Gail, a recruiter at a Fortune 500 company who
recently began looking up potential hires on the Web. “We were
having a tough time deciding between two candidates until I found
the profile of one of them on MySpace. It boasted a photo of her
lounging on a hammock in a bikini, listed her interests as ‘having
a good time’ and her sex as ‘yes, please.’ Not quite what we were
looking for.”
“Another time I went to a candidate’s site and found racial
slurs and jokes,” Gail continues. “And there was yet another
instance where a candidate told me he was currently working for a
company, yet he left a comment on a friend’s profile about how it
‘sucked’ to be laid off, and how much fun it was to be
unemployed!”
As the amount of personal information available online grows,
first impressions are being formed long before the interview
process begins, warns David Opton, ExecuNet CEO and founder. “Given
the implications and the shelf-life of Internet content, managing
your online image is something everyone should address –
regardless of whether or not you’re in a job search,” he says.
Because the risks don’t stop once you’re hired.
Twenty-three-year old Kara recently took a job as a management
consultant at a high-profile practice in the Los Angeles area. An
Ohio native, with no friends or family on the West Coast, Kara put
up a profile on MySpace in the hopes of meeting new people.
Kara was judicious in how she set up her site: “I didn’t fill
out that cheesy questionnaire many people post, where you describe
your best feature and say whether or not you shower every day.” she
says. “I used a photo that was flattering but not at all
provocative and was even careful what music I chose.”
Within a few months, Kara met many others online who shared her
interest in biking and water sports. One Friday morning, Kara
decided to call in sick and go surfing with a few of her new pals.
That weekend, unbeknownst to Kara, her friend posted some of the
day’s pictures on her profile and sent Kara a message saying, “We
should call in sick more often.”
Unfortunately for Kara, her boss happened to be patrolling
MySpace to check up on her college-age daughter and came across
Kara’s site and the dated photos!
Mortified, Kara says she learned an important lesson — not only
about honesty, but about how small the world of online social
networking can be and how little control you have over any
information put out there.
Not all employers search candidates and employees online, but
the trend is growing. Don’t let online social networking deep-six
your career opportunities. Protect your image by following these
simple tips:
  1. Be careful. Nothing is private. Don’t post
    anything on your site or your “friends” sites you wouldn’t want a
    prospective employer to see. Derogatory comments, revealing or
    risqué photos, foul language and lewd jokes all will be viewed as a
    reflection of your character.
  2. Be discreet. If your network offers the
    option, consider setting your profile to “private,” so that it is
    viewable only by friends of your choosing. And since you can’t
    control what other people say on your site, you may want to use the
    “block comments” feature. Remember, everything on the Internet is
    archived, and there is no eraser!
  3. Be prepared. Check your profile regularly to
    see what comments have been posted. Use a search engine to look for
    online records of yourself to see what is out there about you. If
    you find information you feel could be detrimental to your
    candidacy or career, see about getting it removed — and make sure
    you have an answer ready to counter or explain “digital dirt.”
This article is courtesy of Careerbuilder.com

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Posting slower-than-expected revenue growth, flash software maker Adobe Systems Incorporated has announced it would be laying off hundreds of workers in the U.S. and Europe. The news isn't quite so bleak for New York software developer Altair, who has nearly 600 open positions advertised on its website.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the California-based Adobe said it would be cutting as many as 750 jobs in order to better concentrate on its digital media and digital marketing departments.

Adobe said the restructuring also included a bigger investment in its web formatting called HTML5, rather than its popular Adobe Flash player.

Meanwhile, the Troy, New York-based simulation software maker Altair is looking to fill hundreds of jobs at its headquarters and other offices around the world, according to MLive.com.

The company said it was having trouble finding qualified workers with technical degrees. Altair said it recently held 10 job fairs with a focus on hiring talented students, mostly from master's degree programs. The company also announced a new internship program, which is set to get underway next summer.

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With the rise of the internet over the past decade, perhaps no sector has benefited more than e-commerce.
For all the amazing things that the internet does, allowing people to conduct business of all varieties from their home is one of the most impressive. And the trend of this sector growing doesn’t appear to be slowing down.
The Salt Lake Tribune reports that online retailer CSN Stores is hiring a number of workers to help expand its business. Specifically, these workers will be performing customer-service functions at a facility in Ogden, Utah, for the company, which was founded in 2002.
“We just hired the first 30-plus people, and within the next several months, there certainly will be 100,” spokesman for the Boston-based company Dave Ladetto told the news source. “There could be around 200 [hires] over the next year.”
CSN isn’t the only internet company hiring however, as technology giant Apple is looking for at least one “Cloud Systems Software Engineer,” according to postings on its website. The posting says that the hire will help create the “the future of cloud services at Apple!”

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Auto insurance company Progressive Corporation has announced plans to hire more than 1,000 workers across five states.
The Associated Press reports the insurance agency is looking to fill a variety of positions including sales, claims and services.
In all, Cleveland-based Progressive said it expects to hire 1,106 new employees in Texas, Ohio, Colorado, Florida and Arizona.
The largest number of new employees, 390, will be hired for the company’s Riverview call center in Tampa Bay, Florida.
John Hoppe, Progressive’s national employment director, told the Tampa Bay Times that the job growth is largely driven by the company’s ability to build its customer base and beat out its competitors.
“It’s certainly the largest (hiring push) for us in the last five years, both in Tampa Bay and companywide,” Hoppe added. “There are some out there who say auto insurance is a leading indicator for the economy,” he said. “I’m not sure. I’m hopeful, but it’s too difficult to say. We’re able to continue growing in a down economy or an up economy.”
Most of the entry-level jobs will start with a base pay of $12 to $15 per hour.

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