Over the last few years, the increased value of IT in companies of all kinds has created many jobs in this field. Now, as the amount of data tech personnel must manage continues to rise exponentially and advanced devices and software are created to handle it, more hiring than ever should be expected.
The next few years should see nearly 2 million IT jobs opening up in the U.S. alone. According to Gartner, by 2015 American markets should expect about half of all big data jobs to exist within its borders, making the nation a leader in research and progress within the information market.
Part of the push here will be fueled by emerging trends in technology spending as well, ZDNet reported. The source stated that by the end of next year, purchases of hardware and software will push corporate budgets to nearly $30 billion annually, as will hiring new personnel to manage these platforms. Such strong spending trends are being seen on a global scale as well, and there seems to be no indication that big data is losing momentum. This could indicate that more jobs in IT are yet to come.
Content provided by executive search organization, MRINetwork.

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By Kim Isaacs, Monster Resume
Expert
Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to find a sample resume that
matches your background, copy it to your word-processing program,
make minor changes and be done with the arduous task of creating a
dazzling resume? While that would be ideal, you can shortchange
yourself and sabotage your job search if you base your resume on a
sample document.
The good news is that if done correctly, taking ideas from
resumes in books or free resume examples online can greatly improve
your own. Here’s how to use resume samples without copying them
verbatim.
The Pitfalls of Using Sample Resumes
“The problem with using a template or copying someone else’s
resume — whether from a book or from a friend — is that it
doesn’t allow for the uniqueness of each person’s skills,
experience and career history,” explains Louise Kursmark, a career
consultant and principal of Best Impression Career Services.
Kursmark is also the author of 18 career-management books,
including Expert Resumes for Managers and
Executives
and Executive’s Pocket Guide to ROI
Resumes and Job Search
.
Resume writing veteran and author Teena Rose concurs. “Job seekers
need to understand that resumes are like fingerprints; no two are
(or should be) alike,” she says. “Resumes should differ because of
the varying education levels, career experience and scope of skills
that job seekers possess.”
Additionally, copying a sample the author hasn’t given permission
to copy is plagiarism, so check the copyright notice.
How to Effectively Harness Sample
Resumes
Kursmark says there is nothing wrong with taking a little bit from
various samples to make it easier to construct your own resume.
“That’s what sample books are for: To inspire you and guide you,”
she says.
For example, “You might really like one person’s introduction –
the way they’ve clearly presented their unique value — and use
that introduction as a guide for writing your own distinct
content,” Kursmark says. “Or you might grab a
bold accomplishment statement from someone else’s resume
and update the numbers or results to make it applicable
to you.”
Here are more of Kursmark’s tips to help you make the best use of
resume samples:
  • Look for resumes in your field and mine them for
    industry-specific activities, terms and accomplishments. Have you
    done similar things? Is your skill set comparable?
  • After you’ve reviewed resumes in your field, peruse resumes
    across fields to understand how to vary the use of action verbs and
    get a feel for what makes a powerful accomplishment statement. Then
    write your own statements, as appropriate, modeled on the ones you
    like best.
  • Look for innovative formats and striking presentation,
    such as charts and tables. Can you include a strong visual that
    will immediately grab the reader’s attention?
  • Dip into numerous resumes to get a feel for good writing,
    concise yet compelling language and high-impact accomplishments.
    Work on your own resume with those examples in mind.
  • Read your revamped resume with a critical eye to make sure
    it reflects you. Will the image you present in person be congruent
    with your resume? “If you’ve included material just because it
    sounded good but you don’t have the details to back it up, you’ll
    destroy your credibility in the interview,” warns Kursmark.
Finally, when reviewing resume samples, think customize,
not plagiarize. “Use samples as a guide for ideas, but take pride
in writing a resume that has your own unique content and visual
appeal,” advises Rose.
This article is courtesy of Monster.com

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With technology seemingly progressing everyday, it is no wonder that companies on the cutting edge are hiring.
A recent poll of chief executive officers (CEOs) about economic conditions in Silicon Valley revealed that many are optimistic about increases in hiring, according the San Francisco Chronicle.
The survey asked 175 executives a number of questions and revealed that 66 percent of them had increased payroll in 2010. The news source reports that that figure represents the highest percentage since the annual Business Climate survey’s inception eight years ago.
“So 2010 was a comeback year for Silicon Valley,” said Carl Guardino, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of San Jose’s SVLG, a nonpartisan public-policy group. “What’s exciting is we’re seeing job growth not only globally but here in Silicon Valley.”
Looking forward, 55 percent of expect job growth in the region to be even higher this coming year.
Silicon Valley isn’t the only place adding technology jobs as the Chicago Tribune reports that Chrysler is adding 60 positions at its Kokomo, Indiana plant. Some of these roles will reportedly concern information technology.

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