The mobile marking industry is one of the most promising sectors today, seeking to add thousands of jobs over the next few months.
Researchers at WANTED Analytics report there have been more than 6,000 jobs posted on the internet for those looking for employment in the mobile marketing sector. The report found that over the past year, there has been a 26 percent increase year-over-year from the same 90 period in 2011, a 134 percent increase from 2010 and a 400 percent climb from 2009.
Marketers with mobile skills are most frequently advertised for jobs located in the New York metropolitan area. Over the past 90 days, more than 1,000 marketing job ads in New York included mobile skill requirements and grew more than average, up 31% versus the same time period in 2011.
One mobile marketing firm that recently opened a new office and is looking to hire is Fiksu. In a release, the company said that it was opening a new office in North Hampton, Massachusetts and was looking to hire many new positions to handle operations.

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According to one recent report, members of the workforce who are 50 years old or older are more likely to get hired than their younger counterparts.
The recent survey, conducted by Braun Research and commissioned by Adecco Staff, found that 60 percent of hiring managers said they would employ a mature worker, while just 20 percent said they would bring on someone of the Millennial generation.
The survey also showed that nearly all managers surveyed, 91 percent, believed that mature workers were reliable and 88 viewed these older employees as professional.
Some believe the study reveals that companies all over the country place a high value of those with more experience.

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Those with the right information technology (IT) skills can find a number of job opportunities at firms across the United States. According to one recent study, the sector is expected to see employment growth during the fourth quarter of 2012.
The survey from Robert Half Technology revealed that 9 percent of chief information officers (CIOs) expected to increase their company’s IT department during this time frame, while just 6 percent said they would be performing layoffs. Eighty-three percent said that staff levels would remain in place during the fourth quarter.
There are struggles, however, to find enough skilled workers to fill the open spots. Fifty-four percent of CIOs said that they had difficulty getting the right people for employment opportunities.

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According to a recent survey from HeadHunter.com and CareerBuilder, 31 percent of employers asked are looking to bring on board a new executive during the next six months.
The employment plans mark a 23 percent increase from October’s forecast and revealed that there are a number of different positions that will need to be filled over the next half of the year. Twenty-four percent of those surveyed said that they would be adding an executive in the business development department, while 23 percent planned to employ a new information technology executive, 22 percent sought a sales executive and 19 percent looked to fill this role in marketing.
“Hiring trends for executive-level management mirror what we’re seeing in the labor market for all workers,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “As companies look to expand their sales force, develop new products and improve their tech infrastructure, the need for diverse, experienced leadership grows along with these initiatives.”
While many companies are likely to add new high-level staff members, overall job growth slowed in the month of April. A report from the Labor Department revealed that employers added 115,000 jobs – fewer than what was expected by various experts.

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Job growth may be sluggish in certain sectors in the United States, but start-up companies across the nation are standing with open arms. According to an infographic released by StartUpHire, engineering and other technical jobs account for approximately 36 percent of all open jobs at start-ups, but less than 15 percent of candidates are applying for the positions.
Overall, software engineers had the largest number of open jobs in 2011 with more than 42,000 jobs posted. Sales positions were the only other sector where there were less applicants than opening.
In addition to start-up companies looking to hire engineers and software developers, tech giant Google is also seeking trained professionals. Google employs nearly 32,467 people, and in 2012, has shown a greater emphasis on boosting product development, according to ZDnet.
Tech-savvy professionals who want to find employment opportunities may want to consider the benefits of getting in early at start-up companies and how it may be easier to grow at smaller organizations. However, with stable organizations like Google also looking to grow, it may be worthwhile to submit applications to more financially sound employers.

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Increasing demand for computer applications and data is prompting a technology industry hiring drive, according to Bloomberg.
From January to February, online job listings for occupations germane to computer and mathematics increased more than 2 percent. Open opportunities dwarfed jobhunters by a ratio of more than three-to-one. Tech career website Dice.com presently has 12 percent more listings as compared to one year ago.
“This feels like the beginning of another tech-driven jobs boom,” chief economic strategist Michael Mandel with the Progressive Policy Institute in Washington told Bloomberg. “The broad communications sector resisted the downward pull” prompted by the economic recession and “is going to be a leader in the expansion.”
Applications have helped create roughly 466,000 new jobs in the U.S. since the Apple iPhone first made its appearance on the markets.
Apple helped create 514,000 jobs in the U.S. as a result of its various personal devices such as the iPad, iPod and iPhone, according to a study cited by The New York Times. The Cupertino, California-based company released the results of its study late last week.

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Computer technicians in the U.S. can expect promising job prospects in the coming months, according to recent reports.

For instance, Dice.com recently reported that 18 states and Washington D.C. have fewer graduates with computer-related degrees than the total number of available jobs. In California alone, the number of open positions is almost triple the amount of new computer science graduates in the Golden State.

As a result, tech-savvy job seekers who have a background in computer software or information technology, should have little trouble finding career opportunities. According to NetworkWorld, Moody's Analytics has predicted that approximately 138,000 technology jobs will be added in 2011.

“The recovery, which started in the big areas like Silicon Valley, has now spread to all of these other places,” said Alice Hill, managing director at Dice.com.

Furthermore, a new survey by the Illinois Technology Association reveals that the growth of the technology industry is helping reinvigorate the Prairie State's economy in the wake of the recession. According to the poll, which questioned more than 100 tech-related companies, about 40 percent of respondents said that they experienced revenue growth of at least 20 percent in the previous six months.

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With technology seemingly progressing everyday, it is no wonder that companies on the cutting edge are hiring.
A recent poll of chief executive officers (CEOs) about economic conditions in Silicon Valley revealed that many are optimistic about increases in hiring, according the San Francisco Chronicle.
The survey asked 175 executives a number of questions and revealed that 66 percent of them had increased payroll in 2010. The news source reports that that figure represents the highest percentage since the annual Business Climate survey’s inception eight years ago.
“So 2010 was a comeback year for Silicon Valley,” said Carl Guardino, president and chief executive officer (CEO) of San Jose’s SVLG, a nonpartisan public-policy group. “What’s exciting is we’re seeing job growth not only globally but here in Silicon Valley.”
Looking forward, 55 percent of expect job growth in the region to be even higher this coming year.
Silicon Valley isn’t the only place adding technology jobs as the Chicago Tribune reports that Chrysler is adding 60 positions at its Kokomo, Indiana plant. Some of these roles will reportedly concern information technology.

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In January, total employment in the United States grew in excess of 200,000 jobs for the second consecutive month. The Labor Department reports 243,000 positions were added in the month and revisions show 203,000 were added in December. The U.S. unemployment rate fell from 8.5 to 8.3 percent despite an influx of more than 500,000 workers into the civilian labor market.

Furthermore, revisions to previous numbers, based on more complete data, show the employment situation may not have been as bad as first reported. Unemployment peaked at 10 percent for a single month in October 2009 before starting to fall. Past reports had unemployment remaining at or above 10 percent for three months. Revisions to 2011′s establishment data also show nearly 266,000 more jobs were created during the year than previously reported, accounting for nearly a 20 percent improvement.
Growth did not appear overly clustered in any specific sector in January, but rather it was spread throughout many
sectors. Manufacturing added 50,000 positions, mostly in durable goods, likely an extension of holiday spending which seemed to disproportionately lean towards such items. Food services and drinking places added 33,000 positions, healthcare added 31,000 and construction added 21,000. In the temporary help or contract
staffing space, employment grew by 20,100 after having been relatively flat in recent months.

The unemployment rate among those who hold a four-year degree rose from 4.1 to 4.2 percent in January, but that was mostly driven by an increase in those who hold such a degree looking for work. Actual employment by those with a four-year degree rose by 291,000 in January. The management, professional and related occupations unemployment rate fell year over year from 4.7 percent to 4.3 percent. The unemployment rate for those in sales or related
occupations also fell, from 9.1 to 8.2 percent from a year ago.

The recovery from the Great Recession has been characterized by fits and starts. Indeed, when comparing the speed
of the labor market’s recovery to past recessions, our current path is both longer and slower than any recovery over the last half century. The improvements seen over the last few months though, point to the beginning of a virtuous cycle, with an unemployment rate falling more precipitously than would have been projected just a few months ago.

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