Kentucky will soon be home to a brand new customer service center, bringing with it many new jobs as a result.
Amazon announced that it was planning to build a new facility in Winchester, and will hire 600 seasonal and 550 full-time employees by 2017. The 70,000-square-foot building will house workers to provide customer support for clients of the online retailer.
Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear said that he was thrilled that more people would be able to find employment with the Fortune 500 company.
“Amazon’s decision to grow its Kentucky footprint is fantastic news, especially when you consider the impact of more than 1,100 full-time and seasonal jobs it will bring to the central Kentucky region,” Beshear said. “Kentucky is proud to have Amazon choose Winchester for this growth opportunity and wishes them continued success and prosperity.”
Many are looking to the technology industry to help spur job growth. At a recent speech at SUNY Albany, President Barack Obama said that the sector would be vital to the economic recovery of the U.S.
Read more from the original source: More jobs flowing to Amazon

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In January, total employment in the United States grew in excess of 200,000 jobs for the second consecutive month. The Labor Department reports 243,000 positions were added in the month and revisions show 203,000 were added in December. The U.S. unemployment rate fell from 8.5 to 8.3 percent despite an influx of more than 500,000 workers into the civilian labor market.

Furthermore, revisions to previous numbers, based on more complete data, show the employment situation may not have been as bad as first reported. Unemployment peaked at 10 percent for a single month in October 2009 before starting to fall. Past reports had unemployment remaining at or above 10 percent for three months. Revisions to 2011′s establishment data also show nearly 266,000 more jobs were created during the year than previously reported, accounting for nearly a 20 percent improvement.
Growth did not appear overly clustered in any specific sector in January, but rather it was spread throughout many
sectors. Manufacturing added 50,000 positions, mostly in durable goods, likely an extension of holiday spending which seemed to disproportionately lean towards such items. Food services and drinking places added 33,000 positions, healthcare added 31,000 and construction added 21,000. In the temporary help or contract
staffing space, employment grew by 20,100 after having been relatively flat in recent months.

The unemployment rate among those who hold a four-year degree rose from 4.1 to 4.2 percent in January, but that was mostly driven by an increase in those who hold such a degree looking for work. Actual employment by those with a four-year degree rose by 291,000 in January. The management, professional and related occupations unemployment rate fell year over year from 4.7 percent to 4.3 percent. The unemployment rate for those in sales or related
occupations also fell, from 9.1 to 8.2 percent from a year ago.

The recovery from the Great Recession has been characterized by fits and starts. Indeed, when comparing the speed
of the labor market’s recovery to past recessions, our current path is both longer and slower than any recovery over the last half century. The improvements seen over the last few months though, point to the beginning of a virtuous cycle, with an unemployment rate falling more precipitously than would have been projected just a few months ago.

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