According to a recent survey from HeadHunter.com and CareerBuilder, 31 percent of employers asked are looking to bring on board a new executive during the next six months.
The employment plans mark a 23 percent increase from October’s forecast and revealed that there are a number of different positions that will need to be filled over the next half of the year. Twenty-four percent of those surveyed said that they would be adding an executive in the business development department, while 23 percent planned to employ a new information technology executive, 22 percent sought a sales executive and 19 percent looked to fill this role in marketing.
“Hiring trends for executive-level management mirror what we’re seeing in the labor market for all workers,” said Brent Rasmussen, president of CareerBuilder North America. “As companies look to expand their sales force, develop new products and improve their tech infrastructure, the need for diverse, experienced leadership grows along with these initiatives.”
While many companies are likely to add new high-level staff members, overall job growth slowed in the month of April. A report from the Labor Department revealed that employers added 115,000 jobs – fewer than what was expected by various experts.

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Two new reports have found that hiring and revenue in the high tech sector are on the upswing, with more computer software companies struggling to find qualified workers.
According to the September WANTED Analytics report, more than 28,000 jobs for computer applications software engineers were posted online, a 23 percent growth over the past year. Companies on the West Coast had the highest rate of placement for computer specialists during September.
Along with the rise in the number of jobs posted online for software engineers, the report also found that the number of companies looking to hire applications workers grew by 66 percent since 2009. Some of the most in-demand jobs included positions with specialities in Java, .Net and Linux.
A second report by Research and Markets has found that revenue from the U.S. software sector has a combined annual revenue of approximately $220 billion, with about 60 percent of industry profits generated from software publishing.
The report found that the U.S. computer industry currently consists of approximately 500,000 companies, the largest of those businesses include Activision, Blizzard, Microsoft and Symantec.

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Posting slower-than-expected revenue growth, flash software maker Adobe Systems Incorporated has announced it would be laying off hundreds of workers in the U.S. and Europe. The news isn't quite so bleak for New York software developer Altair, who has nearly 600 open positions advertised on its website.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the California-based Adobe said it would be cutting as many as 750 jobs in order to better concentrate on its digital media and digital marketing departments.

Adobe said the restructuring also included a bigger investment in its web formatting called HTML5, rather than its popular Adobe Flash player.

Meanwhile, the Troy, New York-based simulation software maker Altair is looking to fill hundreds of jobs at its headquarters and other offices around the world, according to MLive.com.

The company said it was having trouble finding qualified workers with technical degrees. Altair said it recently held 10 job fairs with a focus on hiring talented students, mostly from master's degree programs. The company also announced a new internship program, which is set to get underway next summer.

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Red Hat, one of the biggest commercial Linus vending companies, plans to hire at least 1,000 new workers this year

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As the global economy slowly begins to improve, California-based Tibco Software Incorporated has announced plans to hire 500 people in the U.S. this year.
Vivek Ranadive, Tibco’s chief executive officer, told Bloomberg News that his business-software company is looking to recruit workers from the nation’s top colleges including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford.
“We are hiring quite rapidly now, all in sales and service. It’s a good time to hire. Some big banks aren’t hiring, so there isn’t as much competition for workers from Wall Street,” Ranadive added. “We are very optimistic about 2012, even in Europe. I think it’s like a well-kept secret that U.S. is doing better.”
Meanwhile, a new report has found that technology professionals are now earning some of their largest annual salaries since 2008.
The 2012-2011 Salary Survey found that after two straight years of flat wages, tech workers earned an average salary increase of more than 2 percent in 2010.
Tech workers in Chicago and Seattle saw the largest increases at 5 percent, followed by Denver, Dallas, New York and Los Angeles.

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Posting slower-than-expected revenue growth, flash software maker Adobe Systems Incorporated has announced it would be laying off hundreds of workers in the U.S. and Europe. The news isn’t quite so bleak for New York software developer Altair, who has nearly 600 open positions advertised on its website.
The Wall Street Journal reports that the California-based Adobe said it would be cutting as many as 750 jobs in order to better concentrate on its digital media and digital marketing departments.
Adobe said the restructuring also included a bigger investment in its web formatting called HTML5, rather than its popular Adobe Flash player.
Meanwhile, the Troy, New York-based simulation software maker Altair is looking to fill hundreds of jobs at its headquarters and other offices around the world, according to MLive.com.
The company said it was having trouble finding qualified workers with technical degrees. Altair said it recently held 10 job fairs with a focus on hiring talented students, mostly from master’s degree programs. The company also announced a new internship program, which is set to get underway next summer.

read more